Designer Diplomacy

So if you have been a follower of mine on Twitter, perhaps you know that I recently came back from a (business) trip to Germany. I wrote some other thoughts about my trip earlier, but now I want to talk about something more specific to design. When I came back to the office, I made a remark to a coworker about how I felt like some kind of a ‘design diplomat’, in the sense of having to negotiate design stuff with our colleagues.

I made the remark in jest, but in thinking more about it, the idea of a design diplomat actually makes a lot of sense! Continue reading “Designer Diplomacy”

Designer Diplomacy

Designers, you should know better!

design-v-UX

I’m sure by now you’ve all seen these things. These clever little images that underscore the design industry’s persistent need to separate UX design from UI design. But as a designer, if you still think this way, you’re doing yourself a huge disservice and it’s time to rethink your approach.  Continue reading “Designers, you should know better!”

Designers, you should know better!

Balancing design simplicity, product complexity, and business growth

I wrote that tweet after an experience at work. It seemed like people were requesting to scale up the complexity of some of the features we were designing, without really any clear rationale (at least initially), and especially not following some sort of iterative release process. And the more I thought about it, the more it started to make sense. That is, there seems to be this idea that as designers, we work to make things simpler, and in the best of cases, we succeed. But in reality (where most of us live :P), this is not always the case, and in fact, products scale towards complexity as they become popular or successful at achieving their early goals.

Continue reading “Balancing design simplicity, product complexity, and business growth”

Balancing design simplicity, product complexity, and business growth

The Start of Something – Begin at the Beginning

Over the course of the past year, I have been in a state of transition. I changed jobs from leading UX design for new products at Alexa Internet (yes, that Alexa…) to working on in-car HMI and UX design at Mercedes Benz R&D North America (MBRDNA). As a designer, it’s an interesting change of focus to say the least.

But this post isn’t about that. Continue reading “The Start of Something – Begin at the Beginning”

The Start of Something – Begin at the Beginning

The Art of Designing Lo-Fi

I was having a conversation recently with someone in my industry. The issue of usability testing came up. Specifically, they mentioned that perhaps they might not have time to run usability tests in the midst of just GSD (getting s**t done). I get it. I’ve felt that pressure. With so many things coming at you on a daily basis, you never really feel like you have time to focus and dig into a meaty problem. My answer though, was that I’ve never really been in a scenario where some kind testing wasn’t possible. It’s simply a matter of scale.

 Eric Barker wrote a really great post that touches on this topic. Go read it and come back if you haven’t seen it. Continue reading “The Art of Designing Lo-Fi”

The Art of Designing Lo-Fi

3 Simple UX Tips to Help Improve Your Product

Earlier I wrote about how UX design is about “curing diseases”. So to totally contradict that post (HA!), not every UX project needs to be a huge, dragged out project. When approaching any project/product, there are a few simple things that I consider first. These simple tips/tricks/hacks can help any kind of product whether it’s for enterprise or consumer, mobile apps or desktop software. Timelines are, of course, up to you. Continue reading “3 Simple UX Tips to Help Improve Your Product”

3 Simple UX Tips to Help Improve Your Product

Curing the disease vs. treating the symptoms: Why good UX intentions can fail

Let’s start off by first saying this: nobody ever sets out to intentionally create bad UX. But it happens. A lot! Even with the best of intentions, people can make really bad decisions regarding the UX of their products. Here’s why. Continue reading “Curing the disease vs. treating the symptoms: Why good UX intentions can fail”

Curing the disease vs. treating the symptoms: Why good UX intentions can fail